Current Research

 
CO2 Tolerance and Anxiety Study

CO2 Tolerance and Anxiety Study

Firefighter Performance Study

Firefighter Performance Study

Microbiome Study

Microbiome Study


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CO2 Tolerance And Anxiety Study

HHPF is helping researchers at California State University, Fullerton evaluate use of a timed exhale CO2 tolerance test as an index of anxiety in healthy adults.

The study is a 2-visit, single-arm pilot evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of a timed exhale test as a quick, easy-to-use, equipment-free tool for diagnosing short-term (“state”) and long-term (“trait”) anxiety among healthy adults.

The study also examines the connections between breathing and anxiety, particularly at nonclinical levels.

Insights gained from this pilot will be used to design a longer-term, randomized trial.

This line of research will identify and test simple ways to measure the impact of stress on respiratory physiology, so we can ultimately evaluate the effectiveness of breath-related interventions in measuring and addressing physiological (CO2 “tolerance”) and psychological (measures of anxiety) responses to stress.

Collaborator: California State University, Fullerton

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Firefighter Performance STUDY

A Pilot Study of Interventions for Improving Firefighter Health & Performance

HHPF is collaborating with Dartmouth College and the Henderson, KY fire department to conduct a 6-week, single-arm pilot (N=20) evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of a 12-minute, 3x/week diaphragmatic breathing intervention on firefighter performance during a simulated firefighting activity.

The study also assesses the effectiveness of this practice on firefighter stress & work-related burnout.

Findings from this pilot will be used to design a larger randomized and controlled followup study.

Our goal is to find and test simple ways to keep firefights healthy, performing well and staying on-the-job.

The study is currently under IRB review and will begin after IRB approval has been granted.

Collaborators: Dartmouth College and Henderson, Kentucky Fire Department

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MICROBIOME STUDY

HHPF is helping researchers at San Francisco State University (SFSU) conduct an investigation of the gut-muscle-brain axis in a 2-week aerobic exercise training study.

The study is 3-arm randomized trial evaluating changes in gut microbiota composition associated with a 2-week training program comprising either:

  • Aerobic exercise only

  • Nasal breathing training only

  • Aerobic exercise + nasal breathing

The study will also assess associations between changes in gut microbiota and aerobic fitness and vagal modulation.

Findings will help us more thoroughly understand the complex and multi-dimensional relationship between gut microbiota, fitness, and our nervous system.

The study is currently under IRB review and will begin after IRB approval has been granted.

Collaborator: San Francisco State University

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Related Publications

Gregory J. Grosicki, Roger A. Fielding, Michael S. Lustgarten, Gut Microbiota Contribute to Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Muscle Size, Composition, and Function: Biological Basis
for a Gut-Muscle Axis

P. Durk, Ryan & Castillo, Esperanza & Márquez-Magaña, Leticia & Grosicki, Greg & Bolter, Nicole & Matthew Lee, C & Bagley, James. (2018). Gut Microbiota Composition Is Related to Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Healthy Young Adults. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 1-15. 10.1123/ijsnem.2018-0024.

 

Breath and Stress Systematic Literature Review

HHPF is conducting a systematic review of peer-reviewed, published literature examining effectiveness of intentional breathing practices on anxiety and stress outcomes.

  • We will disseminate findings to identify gaps in the literature and recommend directions for future research.

Collaborator: University of Southern California, California State University, Fullerton

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